The Steps Of A Functional Assessment

Educational Evaluations

During a functional assessment, the team gathers information and uses it to create a plan to help your child behave in more appropriate ways.

Here are the steps the team takes.

1: Defining the inappropriate behavior.

Using vague words to describe your child’s behavior can make it harder to gather the best information. Saying that your child is “disruptive” doesn’t give enough information. And it could mean different things to different people. For Educational Evaluations in US visit UT Evaluators.

Instead, it’s important to describe the behavior in an objective, specific way. For example, you or a teacher might say that your child “rips up, throws work papers and is argumentative when asked to show work in math class.”

2: Collecting, comparing and analyzing information.

This is several steps rolled into one. Team members work to pull together information from your child’s records, interviews and questionnaires.

Their goal is to answer questions like:

A. Where is this behavior happening?

B. Where is it not happening?

C. How often is the behavior occurring?

D. Who is around when it occurs?

E. What tends to happen right before and right after the behavior?

F. What is a more acceptable behavior that can be used as a replacement?

An ABC chart is a tool that’s frequently used in this step. A stands for Antecedent (what happens before), B is for Behavior (the action or reaction), and C is for Consequence (what happens after).

Your child can help provide this information, too. Only he can tell you how he feels in these situations. Asking him to try to keep track of what he is feeling—and when—could help the team.

3: Hypothesizing reasons for the behavior.

A hypothesis is a best guess based on the information you have. The team works together to figure out what your child’s behavior is telling them. What does he get out of ripping up his paper and being disruptive? It’s the team’s job to figure out what he is escaping, avoiding or getting from the behavior.To know more info on Educational Evaluations check Ieso2013

4: Developing a plan.

Once the team has an idea of the reasons behind your child’s inappropriate behavior, the team works closely with the behavior specialist or psychologist to find ways to see if the hypothesis is right. This means changing something in the environment to see if it changes the behavior.

To do this, they create a behavior intervention plan (BIP). A BIP is a plan that’s designed to teach and reward positive behaviors. This can help prevent or stop problem behaviors in school. For example, it might be helpful to see how your child acts when he’s asked to explain the steps of a math problem out loud—but not in front of the whole class. Or he could show his work on some of the problems but not all of them.

Suggestions in the plan may include:

A. Changes to the physical environment

B. Changes to the way information is taught or presented

C. Changes to your child’s routine or events that happen before the inappropriate behavior

D. Changes to the consequences for a behavior

E. Teaching different, more appropriate behaviors that serve the same purpose (such as asking for help or taking a break when frustrated with math)

Before putting a plan into place, the team has to make sure your child understands the expectations. They have to be sure he can control the inappropriate behavior and is motivated to change. This is where information from a comprehensive evaluation is helpful.

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